How to check the business tax for right

It is never too early to start thinking about your annual business taxes. Day-to-day decisions can have a significant impact on your overall tax obligations. Instead of being surprised at tax time, you should be planning throughout the year to make sure you’re ready.

“When a small business owner plans for tax season strategically and consistently throughout the year, they can create a much better financial outcome for their company,” Jamal Ayyad, vice president of service delivery for SurePayroll, said in a statement.

Regardless of the time of year, here are six “checkups” you can do to make sure you’re ready for your next tax deadline.

1. Ensure that ownership records and hiring/employment practices are up-to-date

In order to guarantee that your business is complying with guidelines that are constantly changing, plan regular reviews of documents and applicable rules, said Scott Augustine, a shareholder with Chamberlain Hrdlicka law firm.

2. Calculate your projected payroll taxes

Small businesses that are having trouble paying their payroll taxes may be able to take advantage of an IRS installment plan, Ayyad said. If you owe less than $25,000 in combined tax, penalties and interest, and filed all required returns, you may be eligible. Visit the IRS website for more details.

3. Do a compliance checkup

The Affordable Care Act, the IRS and the U.S. Department of Labor have rules regarding independent contractors or 1099 employees. Make sure your firm or organization operations are in compliance to avoid costly penalties and fees, Augustine said.

4. Keep up with your home state’s tax issues

Some states take loans from the federal government to meet unemployment benefits liabilities. Ayyad noted that if your state has taken, but not repaid those loans, there will be a reduction in the credit against the Federal Unemployment Tax Act tax rate. This means employers in those states will have to pay more. A number of states may be affected, including Arizona, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island and South Carolina, as well as the U.S. Virgin Islands.

5. Review non-competes and confidentiality agreements

This is especially important for those that have been written by attorneys outside your state of operation to avoid possible theft of important assets, Augustine said. As part of this, he also advised reassessing document-retention policies to make sure they balance exposure with business needs. This will help you avoid issues in tax matter and litigation, he said.